With the local football season well under way, it is important to stay in the best shape possible.

The team here at TB have outlined 5 common injuries and what you might be able to do to make sure they do not limit your potential this football season.

Groin Pain

What’s the problem?

  • Often one sided, or bilateral, groin pain can cause issues with running and kicking
  • Groin pain is an issue with overuse of your Adductor muscle group and it’s tendons
  • Often a compensation for weakness or inactivity in other muscles that support the pelvis and hips.

What to do?

  • Routine of regular icing after training/playing
  • Participating in a modified running program set up by your physiotherapist
  • You will also benefit from a visit to your physiotherapist to get some strengthening and stabilising exercises to help you on your way through the season.

 

Hamstring Tightness and Strains

What’s the problem?

  • One of the most common football injury
  • Restrict ability to run long distances and at high speeds
  • Tightness increases the risk of straining the muscle and missing games of football
  • Overactivity of hamstring muscle to compensate for underperforming Gluteal and Core muscles

What to do?

  • Regular stretches and massage from your physiotherapist or football trainer
  • Visit your physiotherapist to develop a specific stretching and strengthening program for you to complete throughout the season

 

Iliotibial Band Tightness

What’s the problem?

  • Your Iliotibial band can become tight with the running demands of pre-season
  • Can be debilitating and can restrict your ability to run
  • Tightness in the Iliotibial band can place increased strain on the knee and increase the risk of injury

What to do?

  • Regular massage and use of foam rollers to the hamstrings, gluteals and quadriceps
  • Visit your physiotherapist for a biomechanical assessment and a stretching and strengthening program

 

 Shin Splints

What’s the problem?

  • Shin splints can cause pain through the front of your legs every time you take a step running
  • Often arising from large amounts of running in unsupported shoes on firm surfaces
  • Can also arise from poor running mechanics

What to do?

  • Getting into a routine of regular icing after training/playing
  • Regular massages to your calves and soles of the feet
  • Participating in a modified running program set up by your physiotherapist

 

Achilles Tendon Pain

What’s the problem?

  • The Achilles tendon can often become irritated and weakened after a drastic increase in running and exercises after a long off-season
  • This can cause problems with your ability to run and sprint, jump and your agility as well as leave you on the sidelines for extended periods of time

What to do?

  • Act quickly!
  • Get into a regular resting and icing routine after training/playing
  • Regular massages to your calves and Achilles tendon
  • Visit your physiotherapist for an assessment and a progressive strengthening program to allow you to continue to play through the season